Posts in Yacht Art
A Wonderful Time
Ocean Club, Slim Aarons 1968, mounted on canvas in the On Deck Master, onboard Yacht Sweet Escape

Ocean Club, Slim Aarons 1968, mounted on canvas in the On Deck Master, onboard Yacht Sweet Escape

Slim Aarons made his career out of what he called "photographing attractive people doing attractive things in attractive places.” Slim Aarons always had a knack for chronicling just the right people in just the right sort of places.

A hub for glamour, simplicity and relaxation, The Bahamas was a frequent stop for Slim as it was a perfect canvas for his kind of theatre. With the Bahamas’ “pristine beaches and sunshine, you will find glamorous people.”-India Hicks. The above Slim Aarons’ photograph of The Ocean Club, Paradise Island, The Bahamas hangs in the On Deck Master aboard Yacht Sweet Escape.

On Deck Mater stateroom with Slim Aarons’ photograph and Jonathan Adler fabric blinds. Jonathan Adler often incorporates the iconic Slim Aarons in his projects.

On Deck Mater stateroom with Slim Aarons’ photograph and Jonathan Adler fabric blinds. Jonathan Adler often incorporates the iconic Slim Aarons in his projects.

Slim Aarons captured a lifestyle, a moment that can never be reproduced. Slim, who has been called the “photo laureate of the upper classes”, created a visual vocabulary of glamour that spans 60 years – more, if you consider his enduring influence on fashion and modern photography. Slim Aarons was phenomenal at penetrating wasp culture and high society during his time as a photographer of “The High Life”. He made wealth and privilege unapologetic and was capable of producing shots that looked natural; he was able to avoid it looking vulgar or ridiculous. His archives are a treasure-trove of inspiration to designers everywhere.

The Ocean Club itself has a history of being the right sort of place and had been a subject of Slim Aarons on different occasions, displaying chronologically its stability as a playground for the rich and famous. It is still popular as a wedding venue for the rich and famous, a retreat for the ultra-wealthy, and is often featured in movies, videos and major sporting events like the LPGA PureSilk golf tournament.

The initial start, in the 1930’s, of Hog Island being transformed to Paradise Island was by Axel Wenner-Gren, founder of Electrolux. He oversaw the development of his Shangri La, including his gardens that were inspired by those at the Chateau de Versailles. In 1959, Wenner-Gren sold Shangri La to George Huntington Hartford II, heir to the Great Atlantic and Pacific (A&P) Tea Company. Hartford hired the Palm Beach architect John Volk and built the Ocean Club, Cafe Martinique, Hurricane Hole, the Golf Course, among other island landmarks.

There was a fortune spent by Hartford on the build; additionally he invested a substantial amount on the landscaping including the 12th-century Augustinian Cloister. These Cloisters were reported as having been disassembled and shipped piece by piece from France (a romanticized version of events perhaps), as the second version of events is that he acquired and installed them, being from a 14th-century French Augustinian monastery originally purchased in Montréjeau and dismantled by William Randolph Hearst in the 1920s, and having no masterplan they took over a year to reassemble onsite.

Despite its constant stream of absolutely fabulous guests, the venture failed to make Hartford money as he was always lending the hotel rooms out or hosting his friends rather than charging them. Hartford eventually received a casino license, shortly thereafter in 1966, Hartford sold the majority of his share of the island. Now a Four Season’s Resort, The Ocean Club has had previously been owned by Merv Griffen, Donald Trump, and Kerzner International, with the Casino and Augustinian Cloister’s still a major attraction on the island.

MARCH 2019

SS Normandie: Launch October 29, 1932, Lost February 9, 1942
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SS NORMANDIE, An Art-Deco Dream

Normandie is generally regarded as the greatest passenger liner ever created.  The French ocean liner SS Normandie, launched in 1935, was the largest and fastest passenger vessel of its day, majority of her passenger space was devoted solely to first class.  World-class French food would be served aboard her and her cellars stocked with the best French wines. If you could reduce everything glamorous and positive about France in the 1930s to a single object, Normandie was that object. And she was stunningly beautiful: the whole ship was a work of art.

The French Line commissioned artists to create posters and publicity for the liner. One of the most famous posters was by Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, who was also a Russian emigrant to France.

The French Line commissioned artists to create posters and publicity for the liner. One of the most famous posters was by Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, who was also a Russian emigrant to France.

The beginnings of Normandie can be traced to the Roaring Twenties, When the U.S. closed the door on most immigration in the early 1920s, steamship companies ordered vessels built to serve upper-class tourists instead, particularly Americans who traveled to Europe for alcohol-fueled fun during Prohibition.  The French Line was approached by Vladimir Yourkevitch, a former ship architect for the Imperial Russian Navy, who had emigrated to France after the revolution. His ideas included a slanting clipper-like bow and a bulbous forefoot beneath the waterline, in combination with a slim hydrodynamic hull. Yourkevitch's concepts worked wonderfully in scale models, confirming his design's performance advantages. The French engineers were impressed and asked Yourkevitch to join their project. He also approached Cunard with his ideas, but was rejected because the bow was deemed too radical.

The French declaration of war on Germany in September 1939 found the Normandie in New York, tied up alongside of pier 88, New York. In spite of the loss of 28 American lives when a German u-boat torpedoed the Athenia on the first day of hostilities, the United States remained neutral. Authorities immediately put Coast Guard troops on board the Normandie and interned her in accordance with international maritime law. Though the French crew would remain aboard maintaining the vessel, she would remain motionless beside the pier, guarded by the Coast Guard, languishing until American entry into the war two years later into the spring of 1940.

SS Normandie was an ocean liner built the French Line Compagnie Generale Transatlantique. Her novel design and lavish interiors led many to consider her the greatest of ocean liners. Poster by Albert Sébille, showed the interior layout in a cutaway diagram 15 feet long. This poster is displayed in the Musée national de la Marine in Paris.

SS Normandie was an ocean liner built the French Line Compagnie Generale Transatlantique. Her novel design and lavish interiors led many to consider her the greatest of ocean liners. Poster by Albert Sébille, showed the interior layout in a cutaway diagram 15 feet long. This poster is displayed in the Musée national de la Marine in Paris.

When the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) became a part of the Navy on 1 November 1941, Normandie's USCG detail remained intact, mainly observing while the French crew maintained the vessel's boilers, machinery, and other equipment, including the fire-watch system. On 12 December 1941, five days after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Coast Guard removed Captain Lehuédé and his crew and took possession of the Normandie under the right of angary, maintaining steam in the boilers and other activities on the idled vessel. However, the elaborate fire-watch system which ensured that any fire would be suppressed before it became a danger was abandoned.  In 1942, the liner caught fire, capsized onto her port side and came to rest on the mud of the Hudson River.  Although salvaged at great expense, restoration was deemed too costly and she was scrapped in October 1946.


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Yacht Sweet Escape has an Art-Deco influence within her elegant interiors. Art-Deco signatures are throughout from the etched wine wall, art, and down to the carpet weave and inlayed floors. The geometrics in the fabrics and accessories share the vibrancy of the era. The swivel chairs in the salon are covered in an Osborne and Little fabric with the luxury liners namesake Normandie; wallpapers include “Lempicka” and drawings of natural materials like agate, and Fornasetti’s Sole. Alongside the linear decorations and geometric motifs, Art-Deco interiors featured indulgent exotic materials, often with decadent, polished, high-shine finishes much of which can be found onboard. Iconic elements of Art-Deco throughout Yacht Sweet Escape include the starburst mirror, animal prints in the sky lounge, and Capiz tiles in the VIP stateroom.

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When the Normandie was designed, she was to facilitate the first class passenger in mind. Onboard Yacht Sweet Escape, our guests are beyond first class.

One cannot pay homage to Art-Deco without knowing the name Erté. Romain de Tirtoff (23 November 1892 – 21 April 1990) was a Russian-born French artist and designer known by the pseudonym Erté, from the French pronunciation of his initials. He was a 20th-century artist and designer in an array of fields, including fashion, jewellery, graphic arts, costume and set design for film, theatre, and opera, and interior decor.  He used his pseudo name to protect his family from any disgrace of him being an artist having rejected the family traditional of being a naval officer.

His work influenced an entire art movement that was to become known as “Art Deco.” Throughout this period, Erte also created original costume and fashion designs for many of the era’s renowned screen actresses, including Joan Crawford, Lillian Gish, Marion Davies, Norma Shearer. His creations for the stage included extravagant designs for productions at such venues as New York’s Radio City Music Hall, the Casino de Paris and the Paris Opera, as well as for the Folies-Bergères and George White’s Scandals.


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LYRIC OPERA 68

Erte began his career in stage designs in Paris in the ‘30s. He had a major rejuvenation and much lauded interest in his career during the 1960s with the Art Deco revival. By 1968 he was a living icon of the deco era. In this poster he returns to his roots in theatre. Using his signature Art-Deco style, Erte bridges the tradition of a great deco poster design while at the same time making it very contemporary with the almost-psychedelic colors of the swinging – sixties.

Lyric Opera-1968 hangs in the salon onboard Yacht Sweet Escape. The colours contrast the neutral tones of the furnishings. Erte rarely made posters (3 that we know of) and it is a fine example of his amazing talent.


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ARCTIC SEA

1981. Erté is perhaps most famous for his elegant fashion designs which capture the Art Deco period in which he worked.  His delicate figures and sophisticated, glamorous designs are instantly recognisable, and his ideas and art still influence fashion into the 21st century.

Arctic Sea is displayed in Chalet Sweet Escape’s Master Suite. The detail in the metallic embellishment is superb, offering reflections and refraction, much as it’s glacial counterpart.

“ART DECO, OF COURSE, IS THE CONFLUENCE OF CUBISM AND ART NOUVEAU.”
—ERTE (ROMAIN DE TIRTOFF)


FEBRUARY 9, 2019

Some things age and some things become a classic
Cinema Poster for Thunderball, Original hanging in the sky-lounge onboard Yacht Sweet Escape. Original Bond film posters are highly collectable.

Cinema Poster for Thunderball, Original hanging in the sky-lounge onboard Yacht Sweet Escape. Original Bond film posters are highly collectable.

The Bahamas is a classic Bond location: many Bond scenes have been filmed here, including for Thunderball (1965) and Never Say Never Again (1983) both starring Connery, Licence To Kill (1989) and Casino Royale (2006) and subaquatic scenes were filmed for You Only Live Twice (1965), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), For Your Eyes Only(1981) and The World Is Not Enough (1999).

Locals love to talk about Bond films, perhaps because the movies with scenes filmed here were shot when Nassau and some of the other 700 islands that make up the 180,000 square miles of the Bahamas were nothing like the tourist destinations they’ve become today.

Thunderball, the fourth movie in the Bond series, is set largely in The Bahamas. The Thunderball cinema poster is hung in the sky lounge onboard Yacht Sweet Escape.

Thunderball Grotto, located just west of Staniel Cay, is a fantastic underwater cave system that is great for snorkeling, diving, and wading. It is teeming with exotic marine life and a kaleidoscope of brilliantly coloured coral reefs and fish, like yellow-tail snappers, angel-fish, sergeant majors and the like. The Grotto's mystique is heightened by the small, almost hidden entrance. It is advised to enter at ebb tide (low or slack tide) and snorkeling equipment is optional, fins or flippers suggested. At high tide, however, diving equipment is necessary. Yacht Sweet Escape crew will be waiting at the exit for our guests, as the currents can on occasion be substantially stronger than anticipated.

The grotto got its name, i.e. Thunderball Grotto, from the 1965 James Bond spy film Thunderball, which was shot there. It was also the site of another James Bond film, Never Say Never Again in 1983, also based on the Thunderball novel.

Somethings age others Mature…

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Combining two iconic Bond elements, celebrity photographer Annie Leibowitz shot a Louis Vuitton campaign in the Bahamas with Sir Sean himself posing on a dock with a Louis Vuitton bag.  Sir Sean resides in The Bahamas and has had a love affair with golf since filming Goldfinger in 1964. Courchevel 1850 and neighboring Meribel, both have golf courses. The Bahamas has over 10 courses while you can hit eco-golf balls aft-deck Yacht Sweet Escape.

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As it is Valentines Day coming up, hint hint, Yacht Sweet Escape suggests a gift of some new luggage that will be yacht appropriate, (a story for another time), and who can’t help but love the new Louis Vuitton Keepall 50. For the Pre-collection Spring-Summer 2019, The iconic Keepall Bandoulière readies for space tourism. First introduced in the 1930s, the Keepall is here fashioned from Monogram Satellite canvas with the classic LV Initials and Monogram blossoms on shiny silver canvas. Silver-color and blue-color hardware complete the journey.


The Best James Bond Ski scenes

Chalet Sweet Escape  pays hommage to Sean Connery and Ian Fleming’s beloved charter of James Bond. Of course, Courchevel and Meribel have golf courses to visit in the summer months.

Chalet Sweet Escape pays hommage to Sean Connery and Ian Fleming’s beloved charter of James Bond. Of course, Courchevel and Meribel have golf courses to visit in the summer months.

Daniel Craig, Spectre,  2015

Roger Moor, The Spy Who Loved Me, 1977

George Lazenby, On Her Majesty's Secret Service, 1969

Pierce Brosnan, The World Is Not Enough, 1999

Roger Moore, A View to a Kill, 1985

Timothy Dalton,  The Living Daylights, 1987

Entry Hallway at Chalet Sweet Escape. The collection of art throughout the Chalet reflects the love of modern art in Courchevel 1850, married with the history of the Savoyard.

Chalet Sweet Escape is located in the center of Courchevel 1850 and all of it’s high end shopping and art galleries. The photograph below of the waiters skiing epitomizes the grandeur of the ski scenes of the early 1960’s and just how fabulous it all was. This Slim Aaron’s photograph hangs in Chalet Sweet Escape as a simple reminder of a wonderful time.

Three skiing waiters on a ski slope, with the man in the foreground carrying a bird on a tray, the second man carring a wine in an ice bucket and the third carrying a menu, 1962. (Photo by Slim Aarons/Getty Images)

Three skiing waiters on a ski slope, with the man in the foreground carrying a bird on a tray, the second man carring a wine in an ice bucket and the third carrying a menu, 1962. (Photo by Slim Aarons/Getty Images)

While your charter may not allow much time in Nassau to fulfill your shopping list, try pre-arranging it to be onboard for arrival through our local contacts. Don’t hesitate to contact us to arrange for you the ultimate shopping concierge service from John Bull, including Cartier, Tiffany, BVLGARI, and Rolex of course. From ultra rare pieces, to the right sizes, John Bull has several locations in The Bahamas where the right piece may just be or be delivered to. They are in Atlantis, Albany and Bay Street while they also have boutiques through some Bahamas Islands. While your ski trip may include strolls along the Croisette and window shopping at the art galleries, Chelsea and Liam, (our team at Chalet Sweet Escape), can arrange your special gifts or treats to be delivered wherever, or however you like.

February 2019

SOLE MATES: the art of SUPERYACHT FOOTWEAR

First-time yacht charterers are often unaware that they will not be able to wear their shoes onboard their charter yacht. There is good reason for this rule, as the teak decks are easily marked and damaged by high heels, dark-soled shoes, and dirt can be carried onboard from land.

Etiquette dictates you should always remove your shoes before boarding the yacht, unless the Captain says you may leave them on. There's an unwritten rule that you avoid shoes with marking soles or heels as they damage the teak decks, and boat shoes, such as deck shoes, are the preferred footwear onboard. The crew spend long hours on their feet and can prefer to wear specific shoes as part of the uniform, but it is not uncommon to see them barefoot.

Yacht guests generally go barefoot while onboard, as when you’re walking on sun-warmed decks and deliciously silky carpets, barefoot is a luxury experience!

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  • The crew will provide a basket either at the end of the gangway or outside the salon door for you to deposit shoes.

  • For those who prefer to wear shoes on the interior, you do have the option to bring a new pair of flat, pale-soled shoes strictly for use onboard.

  • If shoes are allowed on deck, keep in mind that they should be soft-soled “boat shoes”.

  • But don’t forget packing shoes altogether, as you’ll need nice sandals or flip-flops for shopping and strolling through exotic port towns, dress shoes and high heels for glamorous dinners ashore, and a pair of trainers or comfortable walking shoes for adventures ashore.

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SOLE MATES

For the sole lovers who miss their stilettos, don’t worry! The Salon and Formal Dining room feature a pair of the most exclusive, well travelled soles!  And for the champagne lover, they are just your size!

Australian artist, Pamela Dale has practiced as a professional artist since 1984. Pamela has exhibited widely both in Australia and internationally (France, Holland, Japan). Yacht Sweet Escape has two pieces of her very unique art of “Champagne Shoes”. For this series of art, Pamela travelled throughout Europe, dined on local delicacies, and “sipped” on fabulous champagne. She purchased antique maps of the region that she was exploring, and used the labels of the champagne she drank or the delicacies she ate then she culminates her unique style of textile art.

"La Vie Du Poisson Champagne Shoe”-crafted with the Moet Chandon Imperial label with the blue and the Koi fish, the interior antique map is of Bordeaux and the Atlantic ocean. This mesmerizing piece of art, is apply mounted in the Salon, with it’s aquatic theme and tranquil hues.

“Fleur Du Printemps Champagne Shoe”- crafted with the Champagne Taittinger label with vibrant pink cherry blossoms and geometric design, the interior map is of the Île-de-France or Paris region. The art compliments the wine display in the immediate vicinity with perfection.

The team at Sweet Escape hope you brought your New Year in bare foot and your glass never empty! See you in The Bahamas before we head down to the Antigua Show and the Southern Caribbean for Christmas 2019!

CHRISTMAS 2018